June 09, 2021

CentOS Board welcomes new directors

June 09, 2021 08:56 PM

The CentOS Board of Directors is delighted to welcome two new directors - Davide Cavalca and Josh Boyer - to the Board.

Please join us in welcoming them, and thanking them for their willingness to dedicate some of their time to the endeavor of steering the CentOS Project.

Once again, we thank outgoing directors Karsten Wade and Carl Trieloff for their years of service.

June 08, 2021

CentOS Community Newsletter, June 2021

June 08, 2021 01:58 AM

(Yes, we're a little late this month. Sorry about that.)

Dear CentOS Enthusiasts,

Here's what's happening around the CentOS community lately.

CentOS Linux 8.4 Released

We are pleased to announce the general availability of the latest version of CentOS Linux 8. Effectively immediately, this is the current release for CentOS Linux 8 and is tagged as 2105, derived from Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.4 Source Code. More details are available at https://blog.centos.org/2021/06/centos-linux-8-2105-released/

CentOS Stream Q&A at LISA '21

At the recent USENIX/LISA conference, Mike McGrath and Gunnar Hellekson hosted a Q&A session for discussion of what's happening in CentOS Stream, and other related topics around the CentOS community. The video is available on YouTube, and we welcome your further questions, which you can bring to any of our mailing lists or other public forums.

Topics discussed include proposed special interest groups (SIGs), the downstream rebuild projects, the various Free RHEL offerings, and many other things.

IRC Moving To Libera.Chat

Due to recent changes in the management of the Freenode IRC network, the CentOS project has decided to move our IRC presence off of Freenode over to the new Libera.chat network. The CentOS community continues to maintain a number of IRC channels for simple text-based discussion of a variety of topics around the project.

There are many IRC clients available, or, if you prefer, you can connect with the web client which Libera provides.

CPE Is Hiring

The Community Platform Engineering group, or CPE for short, is the Red Hat team combining IT and release engineering from Fedora and CentOS. Our goal is to keep core servers and services running and maintained, build releases, and other strategic tasks that need more dedicated time than volunteers can give.

CPE is hiring new talent to come work full time on Fedora and CentOS. You can read more details in their blog post, (two of the positions are already filled) or apply directly here:

SIGs

Special Interest Groups (SIGs) are probably the most exciting part of the CentOS project, where people come together to do interesting things on top of the CentOS platform. There's been a lot of SIG activity in recent months, with new SIGs being proposed and approved.

SIG Process Review

Over the last few weeks we have been collecting feedback from SIG participants about the existing SIG process, and ways that we can improve it and make it more transparent and accessible to a wider audience.

The notes from that exercise are in THIS blog post, and will be the basis of some policy rewriting that the Community Architect will be doing over the coming months. If you're interested in being involved in that process, please watch the centos-devel mailing list for more information once that process starts.

Virtualization SIG

- upstream released 4.4.6 based on CentOS Stream 8
- oVirt within VIrt SIG released builds to CentOS Stream repos
- oVirt Spring 2021 survey results available: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1RcSzRQ2YmB2U3MNlWk0YqTVFdGYIdguk46K2A-DZEvc/viewanalytics showing good adoption of CentOS Stream and growing interest in new distributions based on RHEL 8.

OpsTools SIG

Purpose

Provide tools and documentation, recommendation and best practices for operators of large infrastructure.

Membership update

Sadly, we did not attract new volunteers to contribute to the SIGs purposes, but at the same time, we didn't loose any.

Activity

After initial euphoria setting up the SIG and getting to work, we can now observe a kind of settlement. We are still working on the upgrade of collectd to version 5.12. At the same time, and a bit related, collectd upstream has a CI issue we can not fix at the moment. Thus, there was a mirror organisation created and work is ongoing to establish a working CI there.

There is also an interest in investigating in loki as tool to allow multi-tenant log aggregation.

Following the lead of the CentOS project itself, we have switched our IRC channel over to libera.chat.

Issues for the board

Nothing to report.

 

Proposed: Kmods SIG

There's a proposal for a kmods SIG that will come before the Board of Directors next month. The proposal is now in the wiki, and available for your comments.

The kmods SIG will focus on providing kernel modules currently not available in CentOS Stream. If you have comments about the proposal, or want to volunteer to be involved, please bring your comments to the thread on the centos-devel mailing list.

New: CentOS Stream Feature Request SIG

In the May Board meeting, the CentOS Stream Feature Request SIG was approved, and they had their first meeting to discuss how things are going to work. The SIG exists to serve as a gate for feature requests that are first developed in CentOS Stream from contributors who wish to request these features to be included in future RHEL releases.

If you are interested in being involved in this SIG, or if you have changes that you are interested in getting in to either CentOS Stream or future RHEL releases, plan to attend the next meeting, which will be at 16:00 UTC on Tuesdays.

Rebuild Community News

Our friends in the Alma project recently announced their AlmaLinux OS 8.4 release.

And you can read the news from the Rocky Linux project HERE.

Get Swag

Want CentOS swag? We've got shirts at HelloTux, and caps and shirts at the Red Hat Cool Stuff Store.

June 03, 2021

CentOS Linux 8 (2105) Released

June 03, 2021 08:52 PM

Release for CentOS Linux 8 (2105)

We are pleased to announce the general availability of the latest 
version of CentOS Linux 8. Effectively immediately, this is the 
current release for CentOS Linux 8 and is tagged as 2105, derived 
from Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.4 Source Code.

As always, read through the Release Notes at:
http://wiki.centos.org/Manuals/ReleaseNotes/CentOS8.2105  - these notes
contain important information about the release and details about some
of the content inside the release from the CentOS QA team. These notes
are updated constantly to include issues and incorporate feedback from
users.

----------
Updates, Sources, and DebugInfos

Updates released since the upstream release are all posted, across all
architectures. We strongly recommend every user apply all updates,
including the content released today, on your existing CentOS Linux 8
machine by just running 'dnf update'.

As with all CentOS Linux 8 components, this release was built from
sources hosted at git.centos.org. Sources will be available from
vault.centos.org in their own dedicated directories to match the
corresponding binary RPMs.

Since there is far less traffic to the CentOS source RPMs compared with
the binary RPMs, we are not putting this content on the main mirror
network. If users wish to mirror this content they can do so using the
reposync command available in the yum/dnf-utils package. All CentOS
source RPMs are signed with the same key used to sign their binary
counterparts. Developers and end users looking at inspecting and
contributing patches to the CentOS Linux distro will find the
code hosted at git.centos.org far simpler to work against. Details on
how to best consume those are documented along with a quick start at:
http://wiki.centos.org/Sources

Debuginfo packages have been signed and pushed. Yum configs
shipped in the new release file will have all the context required for
debuginfo to be available on every CentOS Linux install.

This release supersedes all previously released content for CentOS
Linux 8, and therefore we highly encourage all users to upgrade their
machines. Information on different upgrade strategies and how to
handle stale content is included in the Release Notes.

Note that older content, obsoleted by newer versions of the same
applications are trim'd off from repos like extras/ and centosplus/

----------
Download

We produced the following installer images for CentOS Linux 8

# CentOS-8.4.2105-aarch64-boot.iso: 677838848 bytes
SHA256 (CentOS-8.4.2105-aarch64-boot.iso) = 106d9ce13076441c52dc38c95e9977a83f28a4c1ce88baa10412c1e3cc9b2a2b

# CentOS-8.4.2105-aarch64-dvd1.iso: 7325042688 bytes
SHA256 (CentOS-8.4.2105-aarch64-dvd1.iso) = 6654112602beec7f6b5c134f28cf6b77aedc05b2a7ece2656dacf477f77c81df

# CentOS-8.4.2105-ppc64le-boot.iso: 722780160 bytes
SHA256 (CentOS-8.4.2105-ppc64le-boot.iso) = 4a83e12f56334132c3040491e5894e01dfe5373793e73f532c859b958aeeb900

# CentOS-8.4.2105-ppc64le-dvd1.iso: 8484990976 bytes
SHA256 (CentOS-8.4.2105-ppc64le-dvd1.iso) = 9cfca292a59a45bdb1737019a6ac0383e0a674a415e7c0634262d66884a47d01

# CentOS-8.4.2105-x86_64-boot.iso: 758120448 bytes
SHA256 (CentOS-8.4.2105-x86_64-boot.iso) = c79921e24d472144d8f36a0d5f409b12bd016d9d7d022fd703563973ca9c375c

# CentOS-8.4.2105-x86_64-dvd1.iso: 9928966144 bytes
SHA256 (CentOS-8.4.2105-x86_64-dvd1.iso) = 0394ecfa994db75efc1413207d2e5ac67af4f6685b3b896e2837c682221fd6b2


Information for the torrent files and sums are available at
http://mirror.centos.org/centos/8/isos/

--------
Additional Images

Vagrant and Generic Cloud images are available at:

http://cloud.centos.org/centos/8/

Amazon Machine Images for Amazon Web Services are published by ID into a
number of regions. A table of AMI IDs can be found here:

https://wiki.centos.org/Cloud/AWS

----------
Getting Help

The CentOS ecosystem is sustained by community driven help and
guidance. The best place to start for new users is at
http://wiki.centos.org/GettingHelp

We are also on social media, you can find the project:
on Twitter at  :http://twitter.com/CentOS
on Facebook at :https://www.facebook.com/groups/centosproject/
on LinkedIn at :https://www.linkedin.com/groups/22405

And you will find the core team and a majority of the contributors on
irc, on irc.Libera.chat in #centos ; talking about the finer points of
distribution engineering and platform enablement.

----------
Contributors

This release was made possible due to the hard work of many people,
foremost on that list are the Red Hat Engineers for producing a great
distribution and the CentOS QA team, without them CentOS Linux would
look very different. Many of the team went further and beyond
expectations to bring this release to you, and I would like to thank
everyone for their help.

We are also looking for people to get involved with the QA process in
CentOS, if you would like to join this please introduce yourself on
the centos-devel list
(http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos-devel).

Finally, please join me in thanking the donors who all make this
possible for us.

Enjoy the fresh new release!

Thanks,
Johnny Hughes

May 21, 2021

Minutes for CentOS Board of Directors for 2021-05-12

May 21, 2021 03:31 PM

Quorum and started at :05

Directors in attendance were:

  • Jim Perrin
  • Tru Huynh
  • Pat Riehecky
  • Mike McLean
  • Brian Exelbierd (Red Hat Liaison)
  • Thomas Oulevey (Secretary)

Others in attendance:

  • Rich Bowen (Community Manager, Chair)
  • Amy Marrich
  • Alfredo Moralejo
  • Josh Boyer
  • Davide Cavalca
  • Paul Isaac’s

Topic:  CentOS Stream Feature Request SIG approval

  • The SIG was approved. Closing issue [#33].

Topic: Departure of Board members and Board nominations

  • Cleaning up accesses from old board members. Tracking progress in [#44].
  • 6 nominations received. Nomination process is still open. Board is happy to keep the nomination process open for a few more weeks.
  • Candidates will be contacted in advance before names are published. Interview with the board will follow.

Proposal: Monthly meeting with the community to discuss board meeting outcome

  • Monthly meeting, scheduled for the week after a board meeting, where board members can discuss the meeting with the community
  • Approved, Rich will check the best format (IRC, other ?) and propose a timeslot.

Reviewed issues :

Adjournment at :38

SIG experience feedback

May 21, 2021 03:21 PM

Thank you to everyone who responded to my call for feedback on the SIG process. A few people responded on-list. More people responded off-list. I’ve summarized common complaints, and in a few cases provided comments verbatim - especially when they already went to a public list.

Please see the centos-devel mailing list for further discussion of what happens next.

The following areas were identified by one or more people as pain points in the SIG process.

Purpose of SIGs

Several people said that we do a poor job of communicating what SIGs are for, what should be a SIG, whether something should be a SIG or part of EPEL, and, in general, what the value of a SIG is.

When SIGs were introduced, they were meant to provide an incubator for projects in the CentOS space and also to provide infra/space to give projects a chance to CI test within CentOS, i.e "how does your project work on CentOS?" Has that focus been dropped? If not, would it be a good idea to reinforce the message?

We need to make it clear that Red Hat still has an interest in CentOS. That message would also be valuable for [Red Hat employees]. CentOS is an important place to put Red Hat’s “upstream first” message into action, but this often gets ignored.

Proposal process

Almost everyone said that the proposal process was vague and opaque.

It is unclear what the board is looking for in a proposal. While there is a template - https://wiki.centos.org/SpecialInterestGroup/ProposalTemplate - examples of good proposals, and what kind of specific things the board will look for, would make this process easier.

Access to the wiki to post the initial proposal is a bit of a chicken-and-egg - that is, without a SIG, who has authority to edit a wiki page for the SIG?

The deliberation/discussion of the proposal should happen on-list, not hidden/secret in board meetings. This will also give other potential projects insight into what they should be thinking about in their proposals.

Onboarding

Several people said that onboarding was confusing and undocumented, and seemed to assume you already know what you’re supposed to do.

Note: Several people specifically called out Fabian Arrotin as being extremely helpful in this setup process, with the caveat that he may not scale if we start getting more SIGs onboarding.

The “what’s next” after a SIG has been approved is very unclear. Once approved, what is the process for getting resources set up?

In the past, the SIG onboarding was often gated on one person, and getting their attention was difficult. This should be better with the new Infra sig.

One of the biggest hurdles is the repo setup (deciding on the cbs/koji setup, naming, setting up repositories for mirrors, etc). If you have never touched koji before, this is going to be tough for you. We need much better onboarding documentation for beginners, along with recommended best practices.

If you’re not a Red Hat “insider,” there’s a good chance that your SIG proposal will be ignored, or at least not given priority. The onboarding for [several SIGs] too more than a year - not because it was controversial, but because nobody prioritized it.

Ongoing communication

A number of respondents commented from the contributor side, about the lack of information/communication from SIGs.

The SIG wiki page says that quarterly reporting is required, but the majority of SIGs do not report, and there is no consequence for failing to report.

It is very difficult to find out from the SIGs themselves what opportunities there are for involvement. One respondent replied “I'd like to be more deeply involved in the [name] SIG. It's always a surprise to me how much I push to be a part of the group and how little opportunity there is.”  SIGs need to be much more proactive in what volunteer opportunities there are.

Some SIGs have weekly meetings, some monthly, and some never meet. This is very frustrating to people who want to get involved in the SIGs, but don’t know where to start.

Having an easier, documented way to contact a SIG with questions or offers of help is needed. Right now, we have out-of-date wiki pages with inaccurate lists of SIG members, and no way to contact them even if it was accurate.

SIG wiki pages must be updated with current information. They should also have a standard format, so that basic required information is always available.

Developer Experience

Several developers complained that they were just expected to know what to do, and not provided much guidance or advice as to how to proceed.

Clearer documentation (or pointers to documentation elsewhere) about package building, and how to set up a CI environment.

It would help if every SIG had the same buildroot setup, so that you know what to expect, and moving from one SIG to another was easier. This will increase cross-SIG engagement.

Developer experience on git.centos.org and CBS. Notably:

- the lack of a working PR workflow: https://pagure.io/centos-infra/issue/228 and  https://pagure.io/pagure/issue/4533

- the way the lookaside works: https://pagure.io/centos-infra/issue/259

- hard to discover clone URLs: https://pagure.io/centos-infra/issue/245

- support for modularity in CBS: https://pagure.io/centos-infra/issue/294

The PR workflow in particular is problematic -- right now we rely on SIG members pushing directly to the repos, which makes code review difficult. It's also a blocker for external contributions (as, though one can technically put up a PR, there is no way to actually merge it).

I would love to have something closer to the workflow in Fedora. specifically:

- allow SIG members to review and merge PRs onto their branch

- kick off scratch builds on PRs to get signal

We need a way for  SIGs to publish structured documentation on docs.centos.org, akin to the "quick docs" model that Fedora uses.

Missing -devel subpackages (I know this has been discussed a lot and fix is in progress).

I'd like to build, tag and push release rpms (as centos-release-openstack). In CentOS7 we could build and tag by ourselves (although it needed infra action to push). In CentOS8 we need to rely on CentOS infra to build and publish them in extras repos.

 

May 19, 2021

CentOS IRC channels moving to irc.libera.chat

May 19, 2021 04:00 PM

TL;DR: #centos and #centos-* are moving to libera.chat

Over the past few days, there has been some upheaval on the Frenode IRC network, resulting in a number of the staff members quitting and starting a new IRC network. I don't wish to explain all the details here, but you can read more at https://kline.sh which also links to other sources.

The various ops have discussed the situation, and we intend to migrate all of the various #centos-* channels from Freenode over to libera.chat over the coming days.

This will take time, since libera is still spinning up, and some servers are moving from one network to the other.

As libera is still in the early stages of setup, you may have significantly more timeouts/disconnects, netsplits and other issues for now. Until the new network is fully stable, we'll all continue to be present in the Freenode channels.

Please bring further questions to the IRC channels, which you can join on irc.libera.chat.

May 05, 2021

CPE is hiring

May 05, 2021 12:17 PM

The Community Platform Engineering group, or CPE for short, is the Red Hat team combining IT and release engineering from Fedora and CentOS. Our goal is to keep core servers and services running and maintained, build releases, and other strategic tasks that need more dedicated time than volunteers can give.

See our wiki page here for more information: https://docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US/cpe/

We are hiring new talent to come work full time on Fedora and CentOS. The following positions are now open:

  • LATAM-based Associate / Engineer level, perfect for someone new to the industry or someone early in their career. We are looking for an infrastructure focused hire.

  • Associate / Engineer level in India. This is more a software engineering / DevOps focused role, perfect for graduates or people early in their career.

  • EMEA-based Associate Manager. We are looking for a people focused Manager to join our team to help with the people management workload. This is perfect for aspiring managers looking to move into their first management role or for anybody early in their people management career.

Please note that due to a constraint in how the jobs system works, a single country is nominated for the advertisement. Please kindly ignore that, two of the roles are available in the geographical regions outlined above.

We are looking forward to meeting you and hopefully working with you soon!

May 04, 2021

CentOS Community Newsletter, May 2021 (#2105)

May 04, 2021 01:07 AM

Hello, friends,

It's been another busy month in the CentOS Project, so we'll get straight to the news:

CentOS Stream News

Last week, Brian Stinson announced some updates on the progress towards CentOS Stream 9 on the centos-devel mailing list.

This included the availability of Stream 9 packages on Gitlab, and a koji instance where you can watch package build activity.

And on Thursday we announced that the CentOS Stream 9 compose infrastructure is available at https://composes.stream.centos.org/ if you want to try out very early builds of CentOS Stream 9.

If you're interested in contributing to CentOS Stream, you should start by registering for a Gitlab account.  We're in the process of updating the contributor guide, and that should be posted soon. Follow the centos-devel mailing list, and @CentOS on Twitter, to be the first to find out the next updates.

CentOS Dojo, May 13-14

The schedule for the upcoming CentOS Dojo is now posted. We'll be featuring two days of technical presentations around the CentOS project and community, including an "Ask me anything" session with the board of directors.

Other sessions include:

Thursday, May 13

  • New authentication platform for CentOS and SIGs
  •  What's new in FreeIPA 4.9
  •  Contributing to the CentOS Stream Kernel
  •  CentOS Stream on Desktop or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love LTS
  • Hyperscale SIG update

Friday, May 14th

  • Board AMA
  • Keeping track of CentOS infrastructure deployments with Ansible and ARA
  • Thinking About Binary Compatibility and CentOS Stream
  • CentOS Stream CI: current state and future plans
  • Hands-on building an AMI pipeline using CentOS Stream 8 and cloud-init

Complete schedule and abstracts are available on the event site. The event will be online, and you will need to register (Free!) on the event website to attend. See you there!

@CentOSProject is now @CentOS

For the past few years, there have been two separate Twitter accounts for CentOS project news - @CentOS and @CentOSProject - and this has led to some confusion. We're pleased to announce that we've consolidated at @CentOS. If you were already following @CentOSProject, you've been automatically moved over to the @CentOS account. The @CentOSProject account will remain as a placeholder just pointing over to the official account.

Meanwhile, if you were following @CentOS to hear from Karanbir Singh, our long-time project lead, that account has been converted to @KaranOrg, where you can follow KB's technical musings and other thoughts around his work and life.

Board nominations open

As you may have seen in the April board meeting minutes, two directors have decided not to run for the upcoming board term. Both of these directors - Karsten and Carl - have served on the board for 8 years, and we have appreciated their service and dedication to the project.

That leaves two seats to be filled in the upcoming term. As per our governance documents, the board selects replacement directors. But the community is asked for nominations for these seats. If you're thinking of someone you think would be a good board member, or if you'd like to nominate yourself, please have a look at the requirements and responsibilities of a director, to see if this is something you (or the proposed candidate) would be willing to commit to. Then, submit your nomination via this Google Form. Thanks!

We're excited at the prospect of bringing new members, with new enthusiasm, to the board, even as we say a fond farewell to long-serving directors, and we look forward to your nominations.

Code of Conduct

We have been working with the Fedora project to draft a new code of conduct, and this was announced a few weeks ago. We expect to implement our version of it shortly after Fedora publishes theirs. We intend to take their final version and make necessary edits (ie, replacing 'Fedora' with 'CentOS' and other related changes) and are therefore waiting until they are done with all proposed edits. We welcome your comments on the centos-devel mailing list over the coming weeks as we prepare to make this change.

Red Hat Summit

Last week we were at Red Hat Summit, Red Hat's annual convention. CentOS had a steady stream of visitors in the CentOS/Fedora booth - thank you to all of you who came and talked with us.

There were a couple of sessions specifically about CentOS Stream - two "Ask the expert" sessions where attendees could ask their burning questions around CentOS Stream. These were very similar sessions, presented twice to make them convenient for people in different time zones. These were recorded, and you can watch them now, with free registration on the Summit platform.

CentOS Stream: Building an innovative future for enterprise Linux

If you have further questions about CentOS Stream, we encourage you to bring them to the centos-devel mailing list, or any of our various social media presences.

SIG reports

CentOS Special Interest Groups are smaller efforts around particular topics or technologies, to produce content on top of the base CentOS operating system. This month we have reports from a few of our SIGs.

Messaging SIG

Purpose

Provide a unique source for messaging related packages. These packages are consumed e.g by the Cloud SIG or the OpsTools SIG.

Membership Update

We had talks with the RabbitMQ maintainers to get RabbitMQ packages included and updated.

Activity

Other than that, the nature of this SIG is to provide ... for other SIGs. The churn is not as big as in other SIGs.

Storage SIG

Repository Status and Updates

GlusterFS 9 was released; the glusterfs-9.1 bug fix update is available.

Ceph Pacific/16 was released; the ceph-16.2.1 bug fix update is available (c8 and c8s).

Bug fix updates to NFS-Ganesha (including libntirpc), Ceph Octopus/15, Ceph Nautilus/14 (c7 and c8), and Gluster 8 are available.

Ceph Pacific, GlusterFS 8 and GlusterFS 9, and NFS-Ganesha 3 (including libntirpc) packages are now built for CentOS 8 Stream. The associated release packages for those will land in CentOS 8 Stream soon.

Group Status and Actions from meeting

The storage sig meeting is moved to #centos-meeting2

Ceph Pacific is now available and can be consumed by other projects:

The OpenStack TripleO CI now consumes cephadm Pacific for both released and pending content -
https://review.opendev.org/q/topic:%22cephadm_pacific%22+(status:open%20OR%20status:merged)

Links and other general informations

Meetings agenda https://hackmd.io/Epc35JIESaeotoGzwu5R5w

 

April 29, 2021

Minutes for CentOS Board of Directors for 2021-04-14

April 29, 2021 01:39 PM

Quorum and started at :05

Directors in attendance were:

  • Karanbir Singh (Chair)
  • Johnny Hughes
  • Jim Perrin
  • Tru Huynh
  • Karsten Wade
  • Pat Riehecky
  • Mike McLean
  • Brian Exelbierd (Red Hat Liaison)

Others in attendance:

  • Rich Bowen (Community Manager, stand-in Secretary)
  • Amy Marrich
  • Alfredo Moralejo
  • Matthias Runge
  • Josh Boyer
  • Davide Cavalca
  • Paul Isaac’s
  • Aoife Moloney
  • Brian Stinson

A welcome was given to guest Josh Boyer, representing RHEL engineering interests.

Topic: Board reappointment, and nomination of new directors

  • Open discussion should take place on public lists, with clear expectations that the vote happens in the board meeting, but that discussion, and nominations, are welcome from the community
  • Discussion of staggering (6 month offset for half of the directors) vs 12 months?
  • Two directors have indicated a desire to step down - Karsten Wade and Carl Trieloff - and need to be replaced. Their term as Directors will end effective April 30th, 2021.
  • Consideration: Maintaining the tension between “new blood” and continuity of leadership.
  • As we take this to the community, we need to be abundantly clear *what* we are asking of them, but early transparent discussion is preferred where possible.
  • Action: Discussion of how we address it if/when someone steps down. Interim board members to maintain above the minimum number of seats? Rich to write up proposals for solutions, to present to the board.
  • Board sentiment is not in favor of an “interim” member class, further differentiating between different directors.
  • Action: Proposal for “emergency election” for replacing a board member who steps down out of cadence. (Rich to add to above proposals.)

Discussion of development packages not provided in CentOS Stream: Red Hat is keenly aware of the desire to make buildroot packages available in the CentOS Stream project. Progress has been made on plans to enable this in some manner in CentOS Stream without requiring changes to Red Hat Enterprise Linux. The team is currently working to resolve some technical issues.

Discussion of CentOS Stream SIG proposal. https://git.centos.org/centos/board/issue/33 and https://wiki.centos.org/SpecialInterestGroup/StreamFeatureRequest General support, but will take this to the mailing list and commit to timely response to this request.

Adjournment at :00

Minutes for CentOS Board of Directors for 2021-03-10

April 29, 2021 01:39 PM

On 2021-03-10 the CentOS Board of Directors met to discuss ongoing business.

A  proposal to discuss the re-appointment of Directors has been presented by Karsten Wade. The document will be reviewed and it will be then proposed for approval during the next meeting. (More info on the governance updates in issues #22 and #24).

Rich Bowen, annouced that a new online Dojo is planned on May 13th and 14th 2021. All the details can be found at :

https://wiki.centos.org/Events/Dojo/May2021

No other issue has been discussed this month, and updates will be amended to tickets if necessary.

April 27, 2021

Minutes for CentOS Board of Directors for 2021-02-10

April 27, 2021 12:08 PM

On 2021-02-10 the CentOS Board of Directors met to discuss ongoing business.

The board welcomed the Hyper Scale SIG Chair (Davide Cavalca) and new Cloud Interim SIG Chair (Amy Marrich).

A proposal to give to all SIG members a @centoproject.org email address has been approved. The new email aliases will be enabled when the new authentication system is deployed in April.

A discussion about the need for a CentOS Stream Kernel SIG around common community interests took place. Some challenges are still being discussed (secure boot, signing, kmods distribution, inter-SIG collaboration, integration of existing external projects). A communication will be sent to the centos-devel mailing list when all requirements are analysed and common ground identified.

Rich Bowen mentioned that additional Dojos will be organised during the year as it is a great way to get community feedback and improve involvement of new contributors.

The code of conduct work is on-going and the board would like to make that process completely transparent, and get help from the community when the initial draft is available

To conclude, as mentioned last month,  the SIG status review has been finalized and updates/recommendations sent to all active SIG.

Minutes for CentOS Board of Directors for 2021-01-13

April 27, 2021 11:48 AM

On 2021-01-13 the CentOS Board of Directors met to discuss ongoing business.

To improve transparency, the Board welcomed all Special Interest Groups' Chair, and extended the invitation to all future Board of Directors meeting.

A proposal to create a new SIG was reviewed and approved. The board welcomes the Hyperscale SIG to the family and encourages interested parties to contribute.
The common goal is to enable CentOS Stream deployment on large-scale infrastructures. The SIG chair is Davide Cavalca.

A recap on all SIG status will be carried on in the next week by Rich Bowen.

Brian Exelbierd explain that Red Hat Developer program will be published as soon as they are ready. A first wave will be released during January.
Red Hat continues to analyse feedback received from all communication channels.

The board agreed to draft and enforce a Code of Conduct, based on the recent work conducted by the Fedora Project.

April 19, 2021

Code of Conduct

April 19, 2021 04:42 PM

You may have seen, a few days ago, that the Fedora project announced a new Code of Conduct for their community.

In my role as CentOS community manager, I've also been involved in the crafting of that Code, so that we could also use it here in the CentOS project.

Yeah, I know, this is something we should have done a long time ago. But, you know what they say about the best time to plant a tree. (The best time to plant a tree is 20 years ago. The second best time is today.)

As we continue to work to make all aspects of the CentOS Project more open and transparent, it is important that we create an open, welcoming community where all people, from all backgrounds, feel safe in their participation. This allows for a broader contributor pool, with more ideas and more community ownership of the resulting outcomes.

And it's just the right thing to do.

It is our intent to take the text of the Fedora CoC, and replace 'Fedora' with 'CentOS' everywhere, and propose it here. There will, of course, be other small changes to the text (Board vs Council, and so on) but not to the details of the Code itself, and how we intend to address reports. We're holding off on those edits so that our version doesn't drift from theirs, during their 2 week comment period. (Ends April 26th.)

The document is derived from the Contributor Covenant, along with work that has been ongoing in the Fedora project for some time. Note also that the Contributor Covenant is also the source material for the CoC used by the Linux kernel project.

To that end, we encourage you to engage in the discussion around the Fedora CoC, because any changes made there will influence what we end up with here. And we also encourage discussion on centos-devel, for anything that you feel is specific to our community.

April 06, 2021

CentOS Community Newsletter, April 2021 (#2104)

April 06, 2021 04:07 AM

Dear CentOS Community,

Thanks for joining us for another edition of our monthly newsletter. Here's what's happening in the CentOS community.

Upcoming CentOS Dojo

Yesterday we closed the Call For Presentations (CFP) for the upcoming CentOS Dojo in May, and we hope to publish the schedule of selected presentations this week. Meanwhile, you can register today for the event. Registration is free, but you will need to register to attend. The event will be online, and feature presentations about many aspects of the CentOS project, including several presentations about CentOS Stream. We look forward to seeing you there.

New AAA Infra

As you are hopefully already aware, we are in the midst of rolling out a new AAA (authentication) infrastructure, which we will share with Fedora. If you have an account on either the CentOS or Fedora account system, you should read Fabian's email (and the responses to it) on the centos-devel mailing list for details of what you need to do.

You will be hearing more about this changeover in the coming days, particularly if you are one of the people who has accounts on both projects with conflicting details (ie, same email address but different usernames, or vice versa).

CPE Update

The most recent CPE Update, which you may have seen on the centos-devel mailing list, covers most of the month of March, and contains a lot of exciting new developments, including the new AAA infrastructure (see above) and the list of priorities for the next quarter. Read the whole thing on the blog.

SIG Reports

SIGs - Special Interest Groups - are communities who are building something on top of CentOS. SIGs are expected to report quarterly on their progress, health, and opportunities for community participation.

This month we have a report from the Hyperscale SIG.

Meanwhile, the Software Collections SIG, scheduled to report this month, appears to be having a rather slow quarter.

If you're interested in running a SIG around your particular area of interest or expertise, we'd love to hear from you. Bring your proposal to the centos-devel mailing list

Updates/Releases

Errata and Enhancements Advisories

We issued the following CEEA (CentOS Errata and Enhancements Advisories) during March:

Errata and Security Advisories

We issued the following CESA (CentOS Errata and Security Advisories) during March:

Errata and Bugfix Advisories

We issued the following CEBA (CentOS Errata and Bugfix Advisories) during March:

Other releases

The following releases also happened during March:

Get Involved

There's a number of places where you can get involved in the CentOS Community. These are documented on the "Contribute" page in the wiki.

Ongoing efforts include the wiki itself, which has accumulated a lot of content over the past decade, much of which could stand to be freshened. If you're interested in assisting with the wiki refresh project, the best place to volunteer is on the centos-docs mailing list. The process for proposing changes to the wiki is covered in part 4 of the above-mentioned document.

This newsletter is another place where we always need help - finding stories, writing the content, translating into non-English languages, and working with community members to provide blog posts, technical howtos, or other content for publication to the blog. Please join us on the centos-promo mailing list to step up to do some of that work.

And the every-day work of answering user questions on the centos@centos.org mailing list, the forums, or IRC (#centos on Freenode) is open to anybody with knowledge, patience, and time. Just drop in and introduce yourself.

Get Gear

If you want to proclaim your love for the CentOS Project, we have two main options for obtaining CentOS Gear. Head over to the Red Hat Cool Stuff Store for CentOS shirts and hats. And HelloTux has CentOS tshirts, polo shirts, and sweatshirts!

April 05, 2021

CentOS Hyperscale SIG Quarterly Report for 2021Q1

April 05, 2021 02:35 PM

This report covers work that happened between January 13th and April 2nd 2021.

Purpose

The Hyperscale SIG focuses on enabling CentOS Stream deployment on large-scale infrastructures and facilitating collaboration on packages and tooling.

Membership update

The SIG was established in January with six founding members (Davide Cavalca, Filipe Brandenburger, Matthew Almond, Justin Vreeland,Thomas Mackey, David Johansen). Since then, four more members have joined (Igor Raits, Neal Gompa, Anita Zhang, Michel Salim).

We welcome anybody that’s interested and willing to do work within the scope of the SIG to join and contribute. See the membership section on the wiki for the current members list and how to join.

Releases and Packages

The SIG releases packages in a main repository. Sources for these packages are maintained in c8s-sig-hyperscale branches in dist-git (example).

Packages released in main are designed to be drop-in replacements for the corresponding packages on a stock CentOS Stream 8 system. This repository can be enabled by installing the centos-release-hyperscale package.

systemd

We ship a backport of systemd 247 based on the Fedora packaging. This includes a variety of bug fixes in existing features such as timers and cgroups, as well as new properties that take advantage of the latest kernel features. You can also look forward to new knobs in the various tools and daemons to make debugging and configuration easier.

By default, this backport will boot the system using the unified cgroup hierarchy (i.e. cgroup2), in line with systemd upstream policy. This can be changed with the appropriate kernel cmdline knobs.

This systemd backport also includes a SELinux overlay module, which allows running systemd 247 on a system in enforcing mode. Nonetheless, the SELinux integration has only seen limited testing and should be considered experimental at this point.

Grep

We ship a backport of Grep 3.6 based on the Fedora packaging. Compared to the stock 3.1 version shipped with the distribution, it includes major performance improvements and several bugfixes.

iptables

The iptables package on CentOS Stream 8 ships with only the nftables backend enabled. As part of the work to enable the legacy backend as well, we have packaged legacy-enabled versions of arptables and ebtables.

MTR

We ship a backport of MTR 0.94 based on the Fedora packaging. This includes several bug fixes, notably improving reliability when running in TCP mode.

dwarves

We ship a backport of dwarves 1.20 based on the Fedora packaging. This includes several improvements to the pahole tool, notably including much better BTF support.

Meson

We ship the latest version (0.55.3 ⇒ 0.57.1) of meson and the latest version (1.8.2 ⇒ 1.10.2) of ninja-build based on the Fedora packaging. This includes many different bug fixes and improvements. We will keep updating them as new versions will get released.

Health and Activity

The SIG was approved by the CentOS board on January 13. So far we’ve been able to maintain a healthy development pace, and hope to continue doing so in the future.

Meetings

The SIG holds regular bi-weekly meetings on Wednesdays at 16:00 UTC. Meetings are logged and the minutes for past meetings are available.

The SIG also uses the #centos-hyperscale IRC channel for ad-hoc communication and work coordination, and the centos-devel mailing list for async discussions and announcements.

Conference talks

The SIG was first introduced at CentOS Dojo, FOSDEM, 2021 (recording). SIG activities were also covered as part of DevConf.cz 2021 (recording) and FOSDEM 2021 (recording).

Future SIG-related talks are planned for CentOS Dojo, May 2021 and for LISA21.

Planned work

The SIG tracks pending work as issues on our Pagure repository. Notable projects currently in flight include:

  • Setting up the experimental repository and publishing a Copy-on-Write enabled build of the packaging stack and optional support for Btrfs-based atomic updates using Micro DNF
  • Shipping up-to-date versions of libvirt backported from Fedora
  • Completing the work to publish an iptables with the legacy backend enabled
  • Engaging with the Cloud SIG to build a set of Cloud images with the Hyperscale repo and packages already baked in

Issues for the Board

We have no issues to bring to the board’s attention at this time.

April 01, 2021

CPE Weekly: 2021-03-31

April 01, 2021 07:50 PM

Hi Everyone,

Sorry for the two week gap since my last report, we had a busy time in
the CPE team with the new fedora accounts deployment, our quarterly
planning cycle started for Q2 and Ireland had a bank holiday mid week
which *seemed* like a great idea at the time. Until no-one knew what
day it was for about a week!

So here I am, right at the end of Q1 with the CPE teams final weekly
report for January, February and March... two days early

If you would like to see this report and toggle to the section you are
most interested in, I would suggest visiting this link
https://hackmd.io/8iV7PilARSG68Tqv8CzKOQ?view and use the header bar
on your left to skip to where you want to go!

Initiative FYI Links

CPE had our quarterly planning call last Thursday 26th March to
prioritize our project work going into Q2 (quarter 2, which is April,
May & June).
Our initiative repo quarterly boards have been updated
https://pagure.io/cpe/initiatives-proposal/boards/2021Q2
and our repo can be accessed here: https://pagure.io/cpe/initiatives-proposal
Our 2021 Quarterly Planning timetable can also be viewed here if you
are curious on when our next quarterly planning session is:
https://docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US/cpe/time_tables/
And finally, details on initiative requesting/how to work with us on
new projects here:
https://docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US/cpe/initiatives/

Going into Q2, the CPE team will work on rpmautospec
https://pagure.io/cpe/initiatives-proposal/issue/11 and aim to deliver
this project within the months of April, May & June. We are starting
this project on Monday 12th April and will keep you posted on where
the team will track work and what IRC channel they will use for comms.

You can also expect a Q1 blog post from us in the next week or two
highlighting the work that the team delivered over the last quarter
too.

Misc

* CentOS Dojo for May 13th & 14th CFP closes on Monday 5th April so
please submit your talks asap!
https://wiki.centos.org/Events/Dojo/May2021

Project Updates

*The below updates are pulled directly from our CPE team call we have
every week.*

CentOS Updates

CentOS

* Account Migration is scheduled for next Tuesday 6th April
* Please read this important email from Fabian Arrotin on
verifying/updating your CentOS and Fedora email address
https://lists.centos.org/pipermail/centos-devel/2021-March/076690.html
* CentOS CI is also updating ocp.stg to 4.7.3 & will roll out to
production by the end of the week if all goes well

CentOS Stream

* Centpkg is build and available in Fedora and EPEL!
* MBS is being deployed
* ODCS is deployed
* Scripts for mass rebuild are ready
* CVE Dashboard for CentOS 8 Stream is up
* In short, lots of good things coming!

Fedora

* F34 beta is out!

* Mass reboot is scheduled for tomorrow, April 1st so please expect
some issues due to this required outage
* Final Freeze is due to start on Tuesday April 6th @ 1400 UTC - F34
schedule can be viewed here
https://fedorapeople.org/groups/schedule/f-34/f-34-key-tasks.html

Noggin/AAA

* Fedora Accounts is out!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
* There are still some corner case issues being worked through but
users should be able to access fedora services as normal. **NOTE** you
will need to reset your password if you have not already done so if
you receive an Unable to call ID or some note like that. Please
request a password reset and wait for the mail to land. Then follow
the link and reset your password.
* For any issues, please open a ticket on
https://pagure.io/fedora-infrastructure/issues
* The team can be found on #fedora-aaa for discussions on IRC
* And please report any issues you find relating to the Noggin
application in the repo https://github.com/fedora-infra/noggin
**ANOTHER NOTE** Thank you so so so much to all of the members of the
fedora community and wider open source communities who assisted our
team last week when we were deploying the new system. Your help did
not go unnoticed and unappreciated and we could not have done this
work without any of you. You know who you are, and you have my and the
wider teams sincerest thanks and gratitude

Team Info

Background:

The Community Platform Engineering group, or CPE for short, is the Red
Hat team combining IT and release engineering from Fedora and CentOS.
Our goal is to keep core servers and services running and maintained,
build releases, and other strategic tasks that need more dedicated
time than volunteers can give.

See our wiki page here for more
information: https://docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US/cpe/

As always, feedback is welcome, and we will continue to look at ways
to improve the delivery and readability of this weekly report.

Have a great weekend!

Aoife

Source: https://hackmd.io/8iV7PilARSG68Tqv8CzKOQ?view

 

March 15, 2021

CPE Weekly: 2021-03-05

March 15, 2021 07:15 PM

Hi Everyone,

If you would like to see this report and toggle to the section you are
most interested in, I would suggest visiting this link
https://hackmd.io/8iV7PilARSG68Tqv8CzKOQ?view and use the header bar
on your left to skip to where you want to go!

Initiative FYI Links

Initiatives repo here: https://pagure.io/cpe/initiatives-proposal
2021 Quarterly Planning timetable here:
https://docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US/cpe/time_tables/
Details on initiative requesting/how to work with us on new projects
here: https://docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US/cpe/initiatives/

Misc

* CentOS Newsletter for March is out!
https://blog.centos.org/2021/03/centos-community-newsletter-march-2021-2103/
* CentOS Dojo scheduled for May 13th & 14th CFP is open, details on
event and CFP link can be found here
https://wiki.centos.org/Events/Dojo/May2021
* New community podcast is out from Red Hat Community
https://twitter.com/redhatopen/status/1367113857936809984
* Lightning Talks & some others from DevConf.cz are now uploaded!
https://www.youtube.com/c/DevConf_INFO/featured
* Check out the most recent blog post on the Fedora Code of Conduct
here https://communityblog.fedoraproject.org/fedora-code-of-conduct-report-2020/

Project Updates

*The below updates are pulled directly from our CPE team call we have
every week.*

CentOS Updates

CentOS

* Legacy CentOS CI Infra Openshift 3.6 has been retired
* CentOS CI OCP clusters updated to 4.6.18

CentOS Stream

* Testing centpkg against the new buildsystem and CBS
* Developing a style guide for CentOS Stream - first draft will be in
a repo on git.centos.org to view/comment by mid-March
* Building CentOS Stream only packages, eg logos, etc for Stream 9

Fedora

* Still in Beta Freeze
* Working on progressing flatpak-indexer, its currently in staging
* Processed 100+ fedscm requests!
* In staging got pagure on dist-git working with the git user instead
of each packager having their own shell account
* Working with debuginfo-d folks to get them set up with resources to
enable it in Fedora infra

Noggin/AAA

* Reviewing dates for a planned outage in March - early estimated
dates are 18th & 19th for production migration. Formal email to follow
to all fedora lists once outage period is confirmed early next week.
* Community blog coming middle of next week on the new account system work
* The work tracker for this project can be found here
https://github.com/orgs/fedora-infra/projects/6
* The team use #fedora-aaa for discussions on IRC
* And please report any issues you find in the repo
https://github.com/fedora-infra/noggin

Team Info

Background:

The Community Platform Engineering group, or CPE for short, is the Red
Hat team combining IT and release engineering from Fedora and CentOS.
Our goal is to keep core servers and services running and maintained,
build releases, and other strategic tasks that need more dedicated
time than volunteers can give.

See our wiki page here for more
information: https://docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US/cpe/

 

March 03, 2021

CentOS Online Dojo, May 13th, 14th, CfP now open

March 03, 2021 06:02 PM

TL;DR:

As promised in my email a few weeks ago, we're going to try to do online Dojos quarterly for the coming few quarters, and we're pleased to announce the first of these.

We will be holding the event May 13th and 14th, once again using the Hopin platform that we used last time. (Those of you who sent feedback about the platform may like to know that this was all passed on to Hopin, and at least some of it has been addressed since then.)

Details of the event are here: https://wiki.centos.org/Events/Dojo/May2021

More details will of course come soon, once we have the online event created.

Registration will be free.

The Call for Presentations (CfP) is now live, at forms.gle/wRa8r5ZRHrqnZ6VF6

We are looking for presentations about CentOS. This can be CentOS Linux, CentOS Stream, CentOS SIG work, any work in the CentOS community, or any project you're running on top of CentOS distributions.

Attendees of the February event specifically asked for more content about:

  • CentOS Stream
  • Koji (and similar ways of managing rpm builds)
  • Creating your own module/package in a personal repo
  • Gitlab
  • CentOS Stream contribution flow
  • FreeIPA
  • Keycloak
  • SIG updates

Please let me know if you have any further questions, and I hope to see your presentation proposals soon!

--Rich

March 02, 2021

CentOS Community Newsletter, March 2021 (#2103)

March 02, 2021 01:25 AM

Dear CentOS Community,

Here's a glimpse into what's happening in the CentOS community, and what's coming in the next few months.

This month in CentOS Stream

We've had a lot going on in CentOS Stream this month, here are some major things we've been working on:

- CentOS Linux Extras and CentOS Stream Extras are composed separately, that way if a SIG only ships on Stream, you can do so

- The CentOS Linux -> CentOS Stream migration instructions were shortened from  3 steps to 2 steps, check them out here:
https://www.centos.org/centos-stream/

[root@centos ~]# dnf swap centos-linux-repos centos-stream-repos
[root@centos ~]# dnf distro-sync

Carl George has provided a short screencast to demonstrate the process.

- The Stream 9 buildsystem is coming along, one architecture (s390x) is having hardware wired in very shortly

- Generated and pushed CentOS Stream 8 containers to https://quay.io/repository/centos/centos

- Kept our business as usual builds and pushes going
- Here are some interesting modules that got released recently:
https://lists.centos.org/pipermail/centos-devel/2021-February/076528.html

Landed in CentOS Stream

The following community contributions have, so far, landed in CentOS Stream.

We appreciate your patience as we improve the contribution process, as well as the reporting around it.

DevConf.cz

The annual developers conference that is usually held in Brno, Czechia, was held online in February. The CentOS Project was featured in two presentations there.

Davide Cavalca presented on the use of CentOS Stream at Facebook.

And Brian Stinson, Tomas Tomecek, and Carl George presented on Consuming CentOS Stream.

We expect video from both of those presentations to be available within the next couple of weeks.

Special Interest Groups

Special interest groups (SIGs) are the place where communities build things on top of CentOS - whether this is software, such as the Cloud SIG or the Storage SIG, or a non-software effort, such as the Promo SIG or Artwork SIG.

SIGs are asked to report quarterly on their progress, so that you know what they're up to, and where you can get involved. We also encourage you to attend the SIG's meetings, where you can find out about the day-to-day work.

CentOS OpsTools SIG Quarterly Report

Purpose

Provide tools and documentation, recommendation and best practices for operators of large infrastructure.

Membership update

Sadly, we did not attract new volunteers to contribute to the SIGs purposes, but at the same time, we didn't lose any.

Activity

After initial euphoria setting up the SIG and getting to work, we can now observe a kind of settlement. For the next quarter, we are planning to upgrade collectd to version 5.12.

There is also an interest in investigating in loki as tool to allow multi-tenant log aggregation.

Issues for the board

Nothing to report.

Infrastructure SIG report

DONE

* Updated SIG wiki
* Updated meeting calendar - Infra SIG will meet every 2nd Monday @ 1500 UTC on #centos-meeting. Next meeting is scheduled on 1st March
* Added x2 new members giving limited access to core infrastructure machines for CentOS Stream that CentOS Infrastructure is assisting in bootstrapping.
* * Leonardo Rossetti & Mohan Boddu. Both are senior engineers at Red Hat and are heavily involved in the development of release engineering and compose building for the upcoming C9S release.
* Completed a full infrastructure-wide upgrade of the monitoring stack to latest version of Zabbix

IN PROGRESS

* Review ticket for mbox koji access
* Review ticket for registering domain name in AU
* Account merge to Fedora account auth system Noggin

TODO

* Develop criteria for infrastructure access
* Admin, there can always be more tidying and refinement on admin 🙂

Governance Documentation

Over the years, the CentOS Governance has been documented in a handful of web pages and blog posts, which has served the purpose. With greater scrutiny on our governance, we are discovering that there are assumptions and "common knowledge" which is not documented anywhere.

As a consumer community (ie, we make stuff, you use it), the governance model was perceived to be less important to clarify before now. This has resulted in some unforeseen problems and misunderstandings over the past few months. Over the coming months we are trying to address this in two ways.

We plan to take the existing governance documents, and consolidate them into more formal project bylaws.

But, also, in this process, we are asking for community input on the governance model, to identify areas where we can improve. We are already implementing more openness around the Board of Directors process, and this is just the start. By telling us how the CentOS governance could better serve you, you can help us make this step towards being a more inclusive, collaborative project.

As we move towards a more contributor model, it becomes more important to clearly document how the project governs itself, and how you are part of that model. We hope that you'll be hearing a lot more about this in the coming months. We also hope that you will engage in this process and help us continue to make the project more transparent and collaborative.

Rebuild News

As various RHEL rebuild projects start up, we're very aware that we're all part of the same family. We look forward to collaborating in any ways that make sense. And, regardless of how (or if) we end up working together, we wish these projects the best of luck and success.

The Rocky Linux project is sending out monthly community updates. The latest edition can be seen here.

And the Alma Linux project has just announced the release candidate (R.C.) for their 8.3 release.

Note: We've highlighted two rebuild projects here, but we're not trying to pick favorites. We're just mentioning the ones that have been brought to our attention. If you're running a RHEL rebuild project, and want us to link to your news in future newsletters, please get in touch with Rich, at rbowen@centosproject.org, or join us on the centos-promo mailing list.

Other Community News

If you have any community news, big or small, please do let us know, on the centos-promo list.

The Foreman Project tweeted about a presentation around managing CentOS Stream hosts:

Phil wrote this excellent article about the merits of CentOS Stream. We think it's worth your time to read. https://medium.com/swlh/centos-stream-why-its-awesome-5c45d944fb22

Get Involved

In addition to the usual avenues for getting involved in The CentOS Project, I would like to draw attention to two specific opportunities.

First, this newsletter: If you would like to be involved in the process of putting this together each month, come join us on the centos-promo mailing list. We start drafting the next month's newsletter as soon as the last one "goes to press", and the more help we can get, the broader vision of the community we can present.

Second, after the recent CentOS Dojo, we committed to doing a quarterly online Dojo until such time as we can travel again (and possibly after that!). We need help in finding and scheduling the content, and promoting the event. Again, fo rthis, join us on the centos-promo mailing list, where that work will be happening.

Get Gear

If you want to proclaim your love for the CentOS Project, we have two main options for obtaining CentOS Gear. Head over to the Red Hat Cool Stuff Store for CentOS shirts and hats. And HelloTux has CentOS tshirts, polo shirts, and sweatshirts!

Until next time ...

Thanks for reading this far, and thanks for being part of the CentOS community!

February 26, 2021

CPE Weekly Report: 2021-02-26

February 26, 2021 07:08 PM

Hi Everyone,

If you would like to see this report and toggle to the section you are
most interested in, I would suggest visiting this link
https://hackmd.io/8iV7PilARSG68Tqv8CzKOQ?view and use the header bar
on your left to skip to where you want to go!

Initiative FYI Links

Initiatives repo here: https://pagure.io/cpe/initiatives-proposal
2021 Quarterly Planning timetable here:
https://docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US/cpe/time_tables/ so you know when
I need it in by to review it.
Details on initiative requesting/how to work with us on new projects
here: https://docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US/cpe/initiatives/

Misc

I hope you all enjoyed DevConf.cz last week! There were some great
talks and I am looking forward to catching up on the ones I
unfortunately missed when they are posted in a few weeks!
Also if you missed the CentOS Dojo at FOSDEM, you can watch all talks
on the CentOS YouTube channel here
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLuRtbOXpVDjC7RkMYSy-gk47s5vZyKPbt

Project Updates

*The below updates are pulled directly from our CPE team call we have
every week.*

CentOS Updates

CentOS

* CentOS CI updated OCP to 4.6.17
* Rolled out security fixes to ci.centos.org Jenkins and cert update

CentOS Stream

* Documentation updated on the shortened CentOS Linux -> CentOS Stream
conversion, see the demo here https://asciinema.org/a/393875
* CentOS Extras is now separately delivered for Stream and Linux
* CentOS Stream 8 container images are published now to quay.io

Fedora

* We are now in F34 freeze! All changes to frozen hosts take 2 +1s
* Bodhi updates-testing activated for F34
* Fedscm-admin work started on default branches
* Openh264 repos are hosted on Cisco CDN

Noggin/AAA

* User migration script has been successfully re-run
* Lots of docs updates - check out the docs section for more
information https://noggin-aaa.readthedocs.io/en/latest/
* PR opened for changes to docs to add pkinit to docs to allow
applicable certs be shipped for packages but it seems fedora-packager
Fedora package has to be built with the change applied
https://pagure.io/fedora-packager/pull-request/166
* If you are experiencing any issues with your application
authenticating with Noggin, please reach out to the team on IRC
channel #fedora-aaa
* The work tracker for this project can be found here
https://github.com/orgs/fedora-infra/projects/6
* And please report any issues you find in the repo
https://github.com/fedora-infra/noggin

Team Info

Background:

The Community Platform Engineering group, or CPE for short, is the Red
Hat team combining IT and release engineering from Fedora and CentOS.
Our goal is to keep core servers and services running and maintained,
build releases, and other strategic tasks that need more dedicated
time than volunteers can give.

See our wiki page here for more
information: https://docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US/cpe/

As always, feedback is welcome, and we will continue to look at ways
to improve the delivery and readability of this weekly report.

Have a great weekend!

Aoife

Source: https://hackmd.io/8iV7PilARSG68Tqv8CzKOQ?view

February 15, 2021

CPE Weekly: 2021-02-14

February 15, 2021 04:36 PM

Hi Everyone,

If you would like to see this report and toggle to the section you are
most interested in, I would suggest visiting this link
https://hackmd.io/8iV7PilARSG68Tqv8CzKOQ?view and use the header bar
on your left to skip to where you want to go!

Initiative FYI Links

Initiatives repo here: https://pagure.io/cpe/initiatives-proposal
2021 Quarterly Planning timetable here:
https://docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US/cpe/time_tables/ so you know when
I need it in by to review it.
Details on initiative requesting/how to work with us on new projects
here: https://docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US/cpe/initiatives/

Misc

Conferences!

* DevConf.cz is on 18th - 20th Feb! Get your ticket here if you
haven't already https://hopin.com/events/devconf-cz-2021
* CentOS Dojo @ FOSDEM was really great last week, and if you missed
it be sure to check out the CentOS youtube channel where all of the
talks are now uploaded and available to view
https://www.youtube.com/thecentosproject

Project Updates

*The below updates are pulled directly from our CPE team call we have
every week.*

CentOS Updates

CentOS

* Our CI infra has been updated from Ocp.ci / ocp.stg.ci to 4.6.15
* Monitoring stack updated to zabbix 5.0.8
* Kojihub now supports x86_64,ppc64le & aarch64

CentOS Stream

* CentOS Stream container images are now readily available!Check out
the mail from Brian Stinson to the CentOS-devel & announce list here
for more details on tags and where to pull
https://lists.centos.org/pipermail/centos-devel/2021-February/076503.html

Fedora

* Mass branching of packages was completed last week
* Mass branching of modules is underway
* There is already have a branched compose
* The main branch changes are also almost complete with just docs left
* tests namespace in dist-git has migrated to “main” with “master” as
symlink for now with it being removed after F34 release, so mark your
calendar!

Noggin/AAA

* Security fixes on Content Security Policy
* Re-installed FreeIPA schema to test a faster way to import user data
as part of tuning & performance testing while still in staging
* If you are experiencing any issues logging in, please reach out to
the team on IRC channel #fedora-aaa
* The work tracker for this project can be found here
https://github.com/orgs/fedora-infra/projects/6
* And please report any issues you find in the repo
https://github.com/fedora-infra/noggin

Team Info

Background:

The Community Platform Engineering group, or CPE for short, is the Red
Hat team combining IT and release engineering from Fedora and CentOS.
Our goal is to keep core servers and services running and maintained,
build releases, and other strategic tasks that need more dedicated
time than volunteers can give.

See our wiki page here for more
information: https://docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US/cpe/

As always, feedback is welcome, and we will continue to look at ways
to improve the delivery and readability of this weekly report.

Have a great week!

Aoife

Source: https://hackmd.io/8iV7PilARSG68Tqv8CzKOQ?view

February 09, 2021

CentOS Community Newsletter, February 2021 (#2102)

February 09, 2021 02:07 AM

Dear CentOS Community,

This month's newsletter is running a little late, because I wanted to include the report from our annual FOSDEM CentOS Dojo, which was held last Thursday and Friday.

CentOS Dojo at FOSDEM

We had 216 registrations, with 164 (75.9%) of registrants actually showing up. The average attendee spent 475 minutes at the event.

Over the two days of the event, we had 8 presentations, all of which are now available on YouTube, if you missed any of them.

We started the day with a round-table discussion with the board of directors. This started slowly, but developed into a useful Q&A with the community, covering everything from CentOS Stream (of course) to the new SIGs, to deep-dives into specific technical issues. We then had presentations about various SIGs (Cloud, Hyperscale) and various use cases around the community.

Overall, we were pleased with the turnout and the interactions, especially in the "hallway" track. We are considering doing more of these events - at least quarterly during the remainder of the pandemic, and then hopefully continue them in the future, for those who remain unable or unwilling to travel to in-person events.

We would love to hear from you about what content you'd like to see at future events, or, better yet, if you want to present about what you're working on.

Upcoming events

In just under 2 weeks, DevConf.cz will be happening (February 18th - 20th). This event is usually held right before, or right after, FOSDEM, in nearby Brno. This year, it's online, with content scheduled so as to be convenient for attendees in Europe time zones.

As every year, there's a  lot of deep technical content covering a wide range of topics. We want to specifically draw attention to two presentations:

On Friday at 14:45 (CET), Davide Cavalca will be talking about the use of CentOS Stream at Facebook. And then at 17:30, Tomas Tomecek, Brian Stinson, and Carl George will be talking about Consuming CentOS Stream.

Details and (Free!) registration are available at https://devconf.cz/.

SIG Reports

Special Interest Groups (SIGs) are one important place where the community can get involved in making CentOS more useful. This month we hear from several of our SIGs about what they've been doing for the past quarter.

Active SIGs hold regular meetings, where you can find out what's happening, and where you can get involved.

Hyperscale SIG

Although not scheduled to report this month, the Hyperscale SIG presented at last week's Dojo about what they have planned, and what they have done so far. You can watch the full presentation on YouTube, and read more about the SIG here.

* Alt Arch

Cloud SIG

Purpose

Packaging and maintaining different FOSS based Private cloud infrastructure applications that one can install and run natively on CentOS.

https://wiki.centos.org/SpecialInterestGroup/Cloud

Membership Update

We have reached out to all current and pending members of the SiG to confirm their continued interest as we revitalize the SiG. Once the membership lists are updated we will be holding nominations and elections for chair and co-chair.

We are always looking for new members, especially representation from other cloud technologies and we’ve reached out to Shaken Fist to see if they would like to join though they are currently Ubuntu only.

Releases and Packages

RDO

Nov 16 Victoria release: https://blogs.rdoproject.org/2020/11/rdo-victoria-released. Interesting features in the Victoria release include:
Source tarballs are being validated using the upstream GPG signature, to ensure the integrity of the packaged source code..

Openvswitch/OVN are not shipped as part of RDO. Instead RDO relies on builds from the CentOS NFV SIG.
The full release notes are at https://releases.openstack.org/victoria/highlights.html

Health and Activity

The Cloud SIG has been very active in regards to creating and publishing builds though it has not held a meeting over the past months. Efforts are being made to revitalize the SiG by re-establishing meetings and grow both the membership and projects involved. At this time, the SiG is only OpenStack.
The OpenStack group is focusing on the Wallaby release, which will be available for CentOS Stream 8 once it is finished. For additional details about the CloudSiG’s plans for CentOS Stream adoption in Wallaby, and previous releases, see the following blog post: https://blogs.rdoproject.org/2021/01/rdo-plans-to-move-to-centos-stream/

Alan Pevec held a RDO and CentOS Stream AMA which is now available on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MlhAhClVaEI&feature=youtu.be

Alfredo Moralejo and Javier Peña presented 'How OpenStack became boring (and successful)' at the CentOS Dojo on February 5th. https://youtu.be/H0JDgsafFD0

Issues for the Board

We have no issues to bring to the board’s attention at this time.

Storage SIG

Repository Status and Updates

  • Ceph Nautilus updates: 14.2.16 (c7 and c8)
  • Ceph Octopus updates: 15.2.8 (c8 only) too
  • luarocks packages were added for upcoming Ceph Pacific
  • GlusterFS updates:  9.0, 8.3, and 7.9 for c7 and c8.  (Note: glusterfs-7 is now EOL)
  • NFS-Ganesha updates: 3.5 and 2.8.4 for c7 and c8; including associated libntirpc.
  • Samba updates: 4.11.17(c7 and c8) & 4.12.11 & 4.13.4(c8 only). v4.11.x is now EOL

Group Status and Actions from meeting

  • SIG needs to update the wiki and the calendar page moving to #centos-meeting2
  • SIG will work on automating cephadm builds

Links and other general informations

Meetings agenda https://hackmd.io/Epc35JIESaeotoGzwu5R5w

Messaging SIG

During the past quarter, there has not been much change in or with the messaging SIG, and there is nothing to report. Its artifacts are consumed by both Cloud SIG and Opstools SIG.

Release and Updates

Errata and Enhancements Advisories

We issued the following CEEA (CentOS Errata and Enhancements Advisories) during January:

Errata and Security Advisories

We issued the following CESA (CentOS Errata and Security Advisories) during January:

Errata and Bugfix Advisories

We issued the following CEBA (CentOS Errata and Bugfix Advisories) during January:

 

February 08, 2021

CPE Report: 2021-02-05

February 08, 2021 07:51 PM

Hi Everyone,

If you would like to see this report and toggle to the section you are
most interested in, I would suggest visiting this link
https://hackmd.io/8iV7PilARSG68Tqv8CzKOQ?view and use the header bar
on your left to skip to where you want to go!

Initiative FYI Links

Initiatives repo here: https://pagure.io/cpe/initiatives-proposal
2021 Quarterly Planning timetable here:
https://docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US/cpe/time_tables/ so you know when
I need it in by to review it.
Details on initiative requesting/how to work with us on new projects
here: https://docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US/cpe/initiatives/

Misc

Conferences!

* CentOS Dojo @ FOSDEM is on right now! Links to talks from Thursday
are on the CentOS youtube channel and Rich is playing a blinder
getting all the content uploaded in record time
https://www.youtube.com/TheCentOSProject
* NOTE: 'playing a blinder' means doing an excellent job for
anyone unfamiliar with the term
* Fedora has a booth as well @ FOSDEM this weekend! Make sure you stop
by and say hi to all those great Fedorans who will be manning it this
weekend https://chat.fosdem.org/#/room/#fedora-stand:fosdem.org

Project Updates

*The below updates are pulled directly from our CPE team call we have
every week.*

CentOS Updates

CentOS

* CI team members are migrating Fedora-Infra and Fedora-apps namespace
whcih is one of the last few before we shut down legacy cluster
* There is also an investigation spike on Zabbix upgrade to current
LTS version which will then be rolled-out on the CentOS Infra once
complete

CentOS Stream

* Python39 built and ready to compose
* Dist-git repos are regularly up to date
* Repos are populated in the CentOS Stream GitLab instance and will be
publically viewable in the coming weeks
* Very detailed talks on CentOS Stream given by Brian Stinson & Brian
'Bex' Exelbierd are watchable now on the CentOS YouTube channel -
check them out!

Fedora

* Infra team are assisting with the testing of ipa/noggin for
otp/other cases in stg
* Their also doing a cleanup of a bunch of broken links on koji volume
* Mass rebuild of rpms is done, modules are underway
* FTBFS for the mass rebuild are filled

CPE ARC TEAM

(Community Platform Engineering Advanced Reconnaissance Team....Team)
We have a new sub team in our team, led by Pingou, who are running
advance investigations on some of the tech debt and bigger initiatives
that the CPE team have in our backlog and they have been tackling
Datanomer/Datagrepper tech debt first.
The team have been partitioning the ‘messages’ table of datagrepper's
DB, & hope to be able to test this setup next week
* prod like in openshift
https://datagrepper-monitor-dashboard.app.os.fedoraproject.org
* prod like with a default delta of 3 days
http://datagrepper.arc.fedorainfracloud.org/datagrepper/
* partitioned table + default delta of 3 days
http://datagrepper-test.arc.fedorainfracloud.org/datagrepper/
* using the timescale postgresql plugin [not implemented yet]
http://datagrepper-timescale.arc.fedorainfracloud.org

Noggin/AAA

* We faced some issues with IPA limits and tuning, and 2FA & still
trying to figure out the best way to enforce 2FA with sudo.
* We are getting closer to migrating from stg to prod and once the
Fedora migration is complete, the CentOS accounts will be then
imported.
* NOTE: If you have an account in both CentOS & Fedora and have
different email addresses associated with each, please update your
preferred email address in your profile and look out for an email next
week on your options.
* The work tracker for this project can be found here
https://github.com/orgs/fedora-infra/projects/6

Fedora Messaging Schemas

* Elections pr reviewed https://pagure.io/elections/pull-request/90
* Next is Greenwave & waiverdb
* Board the issues are tracked on are here
https://github.com/orgs/fedora-infra/projects/7

Team Info

Background:

The Community Platform Engineering group, or CPE for short, is the Red
Hat team combining IT and release engineering from Fedora and CentOS.
Our goal is to keep core servers and services running and maintained,
build releases, and other strategic tasks that need more dedicated
time than volunteers can give.

See our wiki page here for more
information: https://docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US/cpe/

As always, feedback is welcome, and we will continue to look at ways
to improve the delivery and readability of this weekly report.

Have a great weekend!

Aoife

Source: https://hackmd.io/8iV7PilARSG68Tqv8CzKOQ?view

 

CentOS Dojo @ FOSDEM, 2021

February 08, 2021 07:20 PM

Last week we held our traditional annual CentOS Dojo at FOSDEM. We had 216 people registered, of whom 164 (75.9%) actually showed up to attend some part of it. A big thank you to those that turned up and made it a successful event.

In case you missed it, or some part of it, all of the content is now on YouTube.

On Thursday we had four presentations:

  • The Board of Directors had an "ask me anything" session, where questions were fielded from attendees. [Video]
  • Brian Exelbierd and Brian Stinson talked about CentOS Stream. [Video, Slides]
  • Tomas Tomecek talked about the contribution workflow of CentOS Stream, and how that is the process to land changes in RHEL. [Video, Slides]
  • David Duncan talked about building elastic configurations with EC2-Hibernate [Video, Slides]

And on Friday, we had four more:

  • Javier Peña and Alfredo Moralejo Alonso talked about how OpenStack became boring (and successful) [Video, Slides]
  • Davide Cavalca gave an introduction to the new Hyperscale SIG [Video, Slides]
  • Matthew Almond talked about speeding up DNF/RPM using copy on write [Video, Slides]
  • David Duncan talked about building an image pipeline with CentOS Stream and Image Builder [Video]

It was great to get together with the community, even though it was online. We had some great impromptu discussions in the "hallway track", and it was good to see some faces.

We want to do these at least quarterly for the remainder of this year - watch Twitter and the mailing lists for announcements of dates for the next event! We would also like to hear from you what content you would like to see at upcoming events, especially if you'd like to give a presentation about what you're working on.

January 15, 2021

CPE Weekly Report: 2021-01-15

January 15, 2021 06:54 PM

Hi Everyone,

New Year, same CPE weekly(ish)

If you would like to see this report and toggle to the section you are
most interested in, I would suggest visiting this link
https://hackmd.io/8iV7PilARSG68Tqv8CzKOQ?view and use the header bar
on your left to skip to where you want to go!

General Project Updates

We are kicking off Q1 this year with some familiar project faces,
namely Noggin, the replacement of the current FAS system and
continuing our development of CentOS Stream.

Most of our initiatives live here
https://pagure.io/cpe/initiatives-proposal and you can use the new
issue button to submit your own proposal.

Our updated initative timetable can be viewed here for 2021
https://docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US/cpe/time_tables/ so you know when
I need it in by to review it.

We also have updated our docs section on the initiative process we
follow as we cannot accept everything so please do check it out if you
want to understand our process more
https://docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US/cpe/initiatives/

Misc

GitLab

Being very honest, I've found myself a little bit strapped for time to
give this project its due diligence over the last few months, but
please bear with us/me and expect a more concentrated effort on this
coming into Q2 (April, May, June) of this year. I apologise for the
time a resolution is taking and I really do appreciate all of your
patience.

Project Updates

*The below updates are pulled directly from our CPE team call we have
every week.*

CentOS Updates

CentOS

* Community newsletter can be read here
https://blog.centos.org/2021/01/centos-community-newsletter-january-2020-2101/

CentOS Stream

* Continuing to work on Stream 8 pushes and builds
* Investigating how to automate some module pushes
* Reviewing documentation that is available on Stream currently to
identify gaps and where needs improvement

Fedora

* OSBS is building for aarm64 & x86_64 in production since December!
* All of the projects under the fedora-infra and releng namespaces on
pagure have had their default branch migrated from “master” to “main”.
* F34 mass rebuild due to start next week

Noggin/AAA

* New sprint started focusing on testing correct access has been given
per user/account
* Last remaining apps being configured & tested with fasjson API
* Work will be tracked here https://github.com/fedora-infra/aaa-tracker/issues/4
* Our open issues board can be found here
https://github.com/orgs/fedora-infra/projects/6

Fedora Messaging Schemas

* We are working through supybot and greenwave applications currently
* There is a list of applications that require messaging schemas can
be found here https://hackmd.io/@nilsph/H1i8CAbkP/edit
* There is a readme which contains documentation on messaging schemas,
a cookie-cutter template to create the schema and a definition of Done
for writing a schemas
https://github.com/fedora-infra/fedora-messaging-schemas-issues
* The board they are working from can be viewed here
https://github.com/orgs/fedora-infra/projects/7

## Team Info

Background:

The Community Platform Engineering group, or CPE for short, is the Red
Hat team combining IT and release engineering from Fedora and CentOS.
Our goal is to keep core servers and services running and maintained,
build releases, and other strategic tasks that need more dedicated
time than volunteers can give.

See our wiki page here for more
information: https://docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US/cpe/

As always, feedback is welcome, and we will continue to look at ways
to improve the delivery and readability of this weekly report.

Have a great weekend!

Aoife

Source: https://hackmd.io/8iV7PilARSG68Tqv8CzKOQ?view

 

December updates

January 15, 2021 03:55 PM

I usually include the below report in the monthly newsletter, and overlooked it this month. So, without further ado, here are the CentOS 7 updates that were pushed out in December:

Errata and Enhancements Advisories

We issued the following CEEA (CentOS Errata and Enhancements Advisories) during December:

Errata and Security Advisories

We issued the following CESA (CentOS Errata and Security Advisories) during December:

Errata and Bugfix Advisories

We issued the following CEBA (CentOS Errata and Bugfix Advisories) during December:

Other releases

The following releases also happened during December:

January 12, 2021

CentOS Community Newsletter, January 2021 (#2101)

January 12, 2021 12:12 AM

Dear CentOS Community,

As we enter the new year, I'm sure there's really only one thing on your mind, and so we'll start there.

As you are no doubt aware, the CentOS project has shifted focus from CentOS Linux - the RHEL rebuild - to CentOS Stream - the continuously delivered distribution that reflects what will be delivered in the next release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL).

Many, many articles have been written about this, and I want to take an opportunity to call out some of the better ones, to help you understand what's happening, and where we go from here.

To those who claim that CentOS Stream will be somehow unstable, I would encourage you to read Brendan's article about how RHEL is made. Things that go into RHEL are not bleeding edge or continually shifting sands. They are small incremental changes which have been baked for a long time.

To those objecting to the term "rolling release", see Stef's article about continuous delivery, and how CentOS Linux and CentOS Stream related to RHEL.

And to those who are pre-judging CentOS Stream without the benefit of even trying it, you should read Jack's article about not knocking it until you try it. (Jack's an Ubuntu fan, but makes a lot of good points.)

Karsten has written an article about the various things that are kept in balance around the CentOS project, and some of the history that led to where we are.

Finally, Scott's article about ... well, all of it ... is definitely worth your time if you want to have a deeper understanding about why people are angry, and why they are right, and wrong, to be angry.

For those of you who are planning to move to Rocky, CloudLinux, or one of the other projects that has sprung up to take the place of CentOS Linux, we wish you - and these projects - all the best. But we caution you to understand that building an OS is a big project, and it's going to take a while for them to get where they're going. Please plan your migration accordingly.

There are other things happening in the CentOS community, but we understand that this one is pretty overshadowing right now.

Hyperscale SIG proposed

A group of developers has proposed a Hyperscale SIG, which will be voted on in Wednesday's board meeting. They propose to focus on solutions around large-scale infrastructures, such as those at organizations such as Facebook and Twitter.

If you are interested in this kind of SIG, and particularly if you are running a hyperscale infrastructure, we welcome your comments and participation.

CentOS Linux 8 (20-11) released

The fourth release of CentOS 8 is now available, as of December 7th. This release is labelled 8.2011 (ie, November 2020) and is based on the 8.3 release of RHEL.

Q1 CPE Priorities

In Q1, CPE will be working on the following priorities:

  • CentOS Stream
  • Noggin/AAA replacement
  • Fedora-Messaging Schemas 
  • Flatpak indexer code merge
  • Debuginfo-d
  • Datanomer & Datagrepper V.2

We'll be updating the centos-devel list as progress is made on these projects.

Happy New Year

We wish you a 2021 that is happy and productive, and hope to see you in person before the year is out. Thanks, as always, for being part of our community.

 

December 19, 2020

Balancing the needs around the CentOS platform

December 19, 2020 06:40 AM

These past few weeks I’ve read through and listened to a lot people’s reactions and responses to our news about the future of the CentOS Project. I see a lot of surprise and disappointment, and I also see people worried about the future and how this is going to affect them, their livelihoods, and the ecosystem as a whole. I feel a strong sense of betrayal from people, I hear that.

I don’t know if my story here is going to help you or not, but I appreciate you reading it through and listening to what I have to say. The history I cover I think is necessary to understand where we are today. From here I’m going to be available on the CentOS devel list and Twitter if you want to talk further about why I think it’s going to turn out okay.

I’ve been on the CentOS Project Governing Board since its creation. I also was part of the consensus decision that we recently announced about shifting the project’s focus.  I’ve cared about this space for a long time, for my 19 years at Red Hat and prior to that. I was involved in the Fedora Project since the earliest days, leading the documentation project and sitting on the then-Fedora Board, among other roles. I led the team at Red Hat that brought the CentOS Project in closer to Red Hat in 2013/2014, and as a result of that work I earned a seat on the CentOS Governing Board, where I was the Red Hat Liaison and Board Secretary until Spring 2020.

Let’s go back to 2003 where Red Hat saw the opportunity to make a fundamental change to become an enterprise software company with an open source development methodology.

To do so Red Hat made a hard decision and in 2003 split Red Hat Linux into Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) and Fedora Linux. RHEL was the occasional snapshot of Fedora Linux that was a product—slowed, stabilized, and paced for production. Fedora Linux and the Project around it were the open source community for innovating—speedier, prone to change, and paced for exploration. This solved the problem of trying to hold to two, incompatible core values (fast/slow) in a single project. After that, each distribution flourished within its intended audiences.

But that split left two important gaps. On the project/community side, people still wanted an OS that strived to be slower-moving, stable-enough, and free of cost—an availability gap. On the product/customer side, there was an openness gap—RHEL users (and consequently all rebuild users) couldn’t contribute easily to RHEL. The rebuilds arose and addressed the availability gap, but they were closed to contributions to the core Linux distro itself.

In 2012, Red Hat’s move toward offering products beyond the operating system resulted in a need for an easy-to-access platform for open source development of the upstream projects—such as Gluster, oVirt, and RDO—that these products are derived from. At that time, the pace of innovation in Fedora made it not an easy platform to work with; for example, the pace of kernel updates in Fedora led to breakage in these layered projects.

We formed a team I led at Red Hat to go about solving this problem, and, after approaching and discussing it with the CentOS Project core team, Red Hat and the CentOS Project agreed to “join forces.” We said joining forces because there was no company to acquire, so we hired members of the core team and began expanding CentOS beyond being just a rebuild project. That included investing in the infrastructure and protecting the brand. The goal was to evolve into a project that also enabled things to be built on top of it, and a project that would be exponentially more open to contribution than ever before—a partial solution to the openness gap.

Bringing home the CentOS Linux users, folks who were stuck in that availability gap, closer into the Red Hat family was a wonderful side effect of this plan. My experience going from participant to active open source contributor began in 2003, after the birth of the Fedora Project. At that time, as a highly empathetic person I found it challenging to handle the ongoing emotional waves from the Red Hat Linux split. Many of my long time community friends themselves were affected. As a company, we didn’t know if RHEL or Fedora Linux were going to work out. We had made a hard decision and were navigating the waters from the aftershock. Since then we’ve all learned a lot, including the more difficult dynamics of an open source development methodology. So to me, bringing the CentOS and other rebuild communities into an actual relationship with Red Hat again was wonderful to see, experience, and help bring about.

Over the past six years since finally joining forces, we made good progress on those goals. We started Special Interest Groups (SIGs) to manage the layered project experience, such as the Storage SIG, Virt Sig, and Cloud SIG. We created a governance structure where there hadn’t been one before. We brought RHEL source code to be housed at git.centos.org. We designed and built out a significant public build infrastructure and CI/CD system in a project that had previously been sealed-boxes all the way down.

However, the development of RHEL itself still remained closed behind the Red Hat firewall.  This had been true for almost twenty years. For the open source development ecosystem this has been an important and often painful gap—it’s the still same openness gap as 2003.

This brings us to today and the current chapter we are living in right now. The move to shift focus of the project to CentOS Stream is about filling that openness gap in some key ways. Essentially, Red Hat is filling the development and contribution gap that exists between Fedora and RHEL by shifting the place of CentOS from just downstream of RHEL to just upstream of RHEL.

Just as when we joined forces, Red Hat approached the CentOS Project with its plan, and the CentOS Board signed on to it. That plan centered around not just closing the feedback-loop part of the openness gap, but in finding a way to help evolve RHEL development from happening inside of Red Hat to outside of it.

The Board was fully aware that in filling one gap we risked reopening the availability gap on the end-user side of the equation. While CentOS Stream would be open to contribution in a way that it never had been before, it would stand the risk of being somewhat different than CentOS Linux has been.

But we also knew as a project trying to do two antithetical things at once would mean doing both poorly. Providing our community with a solid, reliable distro that is good-enough for your workloads is a strong part of the CentOS brand. We’re confident that CentOS Stream can do this.

And while I’m certain now that CentOS Linux cannot do what CentOS Stream can to solve the openness gap, I am confident that CentOS Stream can cover 95% (or so) of current user workloads stuck on the various sides of the availability gap. I believe that Red Hat will make solutions available as well that can cover other sides of the gap without too much user heartburn in the end.

Beginning now is the time to genuinely help the CentOS Project understand what you need in a CentOS Linux replacement, in some detail. Even your angriest of posts are being read, and your passionate viewpoints are being seen and understood. I’m not the only Linux old-timer working on this.

This is your chance to be recognized for where you land in the availability or the openness gap, and how it is being there, so that the people crafting RHEL solutions are doing it with your use case(s) in mind. This input is happening right now. The new email address centos-questions@redhat.com goes directly to the people in the business unit (who are not in Sales) trying to solve your problems using this open source development method.

It is hard to balance the needs and processes of making business decisions with the needs and processes of making open community decisions. Arguably, Red Hat has been among the best organizations at straddling this hard, thin line. If you trust our code enough to run it for this long, I ask you to trust us to make good decisions here. I ask you to trust Red Hat and the CentOS Board to work with you to find a way to bring the community along into the next chapter.

If you want to talk with me further, the best place is the centos-devel list or Twitter.

December 11, 2020

How RHEL is Made

December 11, 2020 05:49 PM

This week Red Hat announced its plan to put all its energy into CentOS Stream 8, resulting in the discontinuation of CentOS Linux 8 in one year’s time.  CentOS Stream, originally announced in September of 2019, is a continuous release of RHEL which provides updates as soon as they are developed and verified.  Many people who use CentOS Linux today now wonder if CentOS Stream 8 will be a suitable distribution for their use: is it tested, will it be stable?  If you want to know what to expect from CentOS Stream, the best starting point is knowing how Red Hat Enterprise Linux is built.  Let’s get into it!

Red Hat has been making Linux releases for such a long time, its original development methodology predates the agile manifesto.  Historically, RHEL has been built behind closed doors, its plans held close enough that even the announcement of predictable 6-month minor / 3-year major releases seemed a monumental reveal during the RHEL 8 launch.  Fortunately, how Red Hat makes Linux distributions has evolved, not just since calendar years started with “19”, and there have been multiple process generations since RHEL 8 launched just 18 months ago.  While fundamentals like upstream first, copious quality engineering, ecosystem partnership, and customer care remain the same, we work continuously to improve how those fundamentals are implemented.  

Let’s start with grounding: every RHEL minor release is based on the previous release, plus targeted backports of upstream development.  Often, Red Hatters are the original authors of those patches, but there are no shortcuts: upstream acceptance is the first test every patch must go through before we start it through the journey that eventually leads to a patch’s integration in the release.  Even then, this is about an upstream patch existing, but that alone will not guarantee a patch’s inclusion.

Any decision to introduce an upstream change into RHEL is a team decision and the team is large: developers, quality engineers, support personnel, product owners, and various partners all work together on priority and feasibility.  Once a decision is reached and commitments are made, only then do developers and quality engineers begin writing code.  As you probably know, in the most congenial of rivalries, developers try to write code that nobody can break and quality engineers create batteries of ways to break the code developers write.  This brings us to the second key place where Red Hat invests: tests.

We write tests for everything: unit tests, systemic tests, kernel and userspace ABI conformance tests, performance tests, dependency tests, architecture tests, driver tests, load tests, and many more.  Having tests is foundational, but it is their application that brings meaning.  This brings us to the third key area where Red Hat invests: process infrastructure.

For the last several years, Red Hat has worked on a series of “Always Ready” operating system initiatives.  The goal is as simple as the name suggests: at any moment in time the OS is ready for release.  It’s easier to describe than it is to implement. In complex systems, so many things can have unintended consequences.  To handle this we use layers of automation, incrementally building confidence in changes, before they are integrated and released into the distribution.  Here is a high-level sketch of the process every single change in RHEL must go through to be included:

When a change is targeted at RHEL, multiple incremental steps occur before it is actually included.  Changes are built, but the only certain outcome is that a CI system will run a suite of tests on the builds (the build is not yet made available for general use).  If those tests pass, a second round of preverification specific to the code change occurs (not yet good enough).  And if those tests pass, the change is tentatively included in the errata system and subject to further verification (it’s still not ready to publish).  Systemic test suites run on the combined whole to verify the gestalt functionality.  And if those tests pass, the build will finally make it into the space where CentOS Stream systems recognize it as an available update.  It’s a long pipeline and many changes move through it every single day.  For those interested in more of the vision and architecture of this system, you can read more in CentOS Stream is Continuous Delivery!

While the description of this system may seem elegant and reassuring, watching it in action can feel quite the opposite: The more testing is done the more bugs are found- and Red Hat does a whole lot of testing.  Historically, RHEL development has been done behind closed doors, isolating people from the routine bug identification and remediation process, only allowing the world to see the end result.  In the future, as RHEL development becomes more transparent, as we approach RHEL 9, this process will become uncomfortably visible.  While the testing systems are built to prevent such failures from reaching end users, anybody who wants to look deeper may be surprised at how messy operating system development can be!

Finally, for those who wonder how soon all this will map to CentOS Stream, we have good news: it is already happening today with RHEL 8.4 and CentOS Stream 8!  At the same time these RHEL builds are verified, they are also delivered to CentOS Stream.  Of course we aren’t done yet: CentOS Stream has not yet realized its mission of adding a developer community around RHEL, that is where we are headed, into a place where there are more options to engage with Red Hat and shape future RHEL.  There is always room for improvement, from better tests to more facets in future collaboration, we are excited to share building RHEL with you so that we build a better OS with and for you.

Minutes for CentOS Board of Directors for 2020-11-11

December 11, 2020 05:49 PM

On 2020-11-11 the CentOS Board of Directors met to discuss ongoing business.

First, the board would like to thanks everybody involved in CentOS Linux 7.9 release.

The Board was in an Executive session, where Red Hat CTO, Chris Wright joined to present Red Hat plan around CentOS Linux and CentOS Stream. A Board discussion followed.

Following up the discussion around the different users' communities impacted by proposed changes, Chris Wright, mentioned to the Board that Red Hat is also reshaping and expanding the RHEL Developer program. The details will be communicated through standard Red Hat channels.

The following resolutions were approved by the majority of the Board :

  • CentOS Stream 8 will continue with contributions for the full-support phase of RHEL 8. APPROVED
  • CentOS Stream 9 will start on schedule with the RHEL 9 Beta. APPROVED
  • CentOS Linux 9 will not start. APPROVED
  • CentOS Linux 8 ends in December 2021. APPROVED

An announcement and detailed FAQ will be prepared in next weeks.

No other issue has been discussed this month, and updates will be amended to tickets if necessary.


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Last updated: June 18, 2021 08:00 PM